Conservatives Embrace Climate Action


When large majorities of Americans decide they want to act in response to a national problem, our country has a history of accepting weak policy over no policy. That’s what’s happening right now on climate change. There is no serious effort to move bold solutions through either chamber of Congress. But yet, solid majorities of Americans — including a majority of Republicans and Millennials — have decided that they want action on climate and energy. Check out some reason polling.

In a National Energy Innovation Survey commissioned by Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions, 77 percent of voters said they would reward a candidate who promotes diversification and growth of clean energy sources. Fifty-five percent of all voters are more likely to support a candidate who believes human activity contributes to climate change and even more critical, 65 percent are less likely to support a candidate who believes climate change is a hoax.

“Voters believe climate change is real and they want a candidate who recognizes the challenges associated with it.” Citizens for Responsible Energy Solutions, National Energy Innovations Survey, June 2016

Clearly voters are ready to move past the arguments over climate science in this country and are ready to focus on solutions. As the electorate changes with each successive election, an opportunity exists to offer voters an energy plan that is focused on growth, energy security, and environmental health – not burdensome regulations.

A ClearPath national poll found most voters —including most conservative Republicans— think the climate is changing and that human action is probably contributing at least a little to the change.

“The percent [of Republicans] saying they think the climate is not changing is in single digits.” Echelon Insights - in partnership with North Star Opinion Research and Public Opinion Strategies, September 2015

Overall, 73 percent of voters indicated that they think the climate is changing and that mankind probably plays some kind of role in contributing to that change, whether a little or a lot.

A George Mason University and Yale University study found registered voters support a broad array of energy policies, including many designed to reduce carbon pollution and dependence on fossil fuels, and to promote clean energy.

“Americans are less likely to vote for a presidential candidate who strongly opposes taking action to reduce global warming. Asked if they would be more or less willing to vote for a presidential candidate who strongly opposes action to reduce global warming, registered voters are about four times more likely to vote against such a candidate, than to vote for them Politics and Global Warming Report, George Mason University and Yale University, April 2016.

68 percent of registered voters support requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a carbon tax and using the money to reduce other taxes such as income taxes by an equal amount.